The Hindustan Times
Last updated[Metro]02:00 IST Wednesday, October 13, 1999, New Delhi
 

 NEWS
  FRONT PAGE
  CITY
  STATES
  NATION
  FOREIGN
  ECONOMY
  SPORTS
  OPINION
  EDITORIAL
  CARTOON
  LETTERS
 HOME
 
 MAGAZINE
  NETFILE
  HTCITY
  SUNDAY
  GOURMET FARE
  ECARDS
  TODAY'S POLL
  HT INVESTOR
 
 MARKET
  CLASSIFIEDS
  STOCKS
  "CALL INDIA FROM US: 30 CENTS/MIN"
  JOBS
  "CALL INDIA FOR PENNIES A MESSAGE"
 
 OTHERS
  ABOUT US
  SEARCH
  ARCHIVE
  FEEDBACK
  ADVERTISE
 
 
Letters 
 

Under the legal garb


APROPOS OF Ending law’s delay (Sept. 25). While it is commendable for the Supreme Court to have set a three-year time-frame for the prosecution evidence in criminal cases to conclude, there are loopholes left for the culprit (read prosecution) to go scot free. The suggested exclusion (from the time-frame) of the period of the judge’s leave etc, is an indication towards such a way out! This period of three years would start only after the first summoning of the prosecution witnesses.

And this must begin only after the charges are framed. There are thousands of cases where charges were framed after many years, e.g.the Tihar jailbreak took place in March 1986, but charges were framed in 1994. Besides, the apex court has not made any distinction between cases where the accused are released on bail and those where they are languishing in jail.

While the prisoner is guaranteed a speedy trial by Article 21 of the Constitution and a day-to-day trial by Section 3089(1) of the Code of Criminal Procedure 1973, he denied this right every time. Only if the judges become a bit more lenient towards prisoners’ woes would they be able to reform themselves and start life afresh.

ANWAR AHMED

Delhi

Justice delayed

APROPOS OF the editorial Ending law’s delay (Sept. 25). A backlog of 30 million court cases across the country including 16,000 in the Supreme Court is mind-boggling. The huge arrears of court cases are the result of needless adjournments, lengthy arguments, lawyers strikes and a host of other factors.

One question arises as to why the court procedures are not simplified. In the court proceedings the affidavit from defendant and deponent should be ascertained. Then the date of arguments. On the basis of arguments the judge should announce the judgment. This would minimise the delay procedures of the courts. Wherever the evidence is a prima facie evident, the judgment should not be delayed.

TARAN VIR SINGH

Delhi

Punching bags

IN OLDEN days many hotels used to keep a boy on their staff whose job was to take abuses and beatings of the manager for anybody’s fault. For the very nature of this job he was known by the denomination of chapat khoora (the slap taker) than his real name. The moment he was summoned before a complaining customer he stood ready for his part, of taking the choicest expletives and getting beaten and blue by the manager for something which he was not even aware of till such time the complainant himself begged the manager to stop it and preferred to withdraw his complaint.

Confronted with the ever-looming shadows of Osama bin Laden and Saddam Hussain and their periodically controlled enlargements by the holders of these shadows, I find the modus operandi no different from that of a chapat khoora and his manager. Not only the rogues were created but were also allowed to assume and sustain the monstrous proportions. Thrashing of Saddam and Bin Laden ghosts by their benefactors is nothing but replay of an old trick. Dump your failings on the punching bags invented for the purpose and take the credit of unsuspecting clients like us.

MEHMOOD M. ABDI

Mumbai

Care a ‘dam’

IN THE article by Gail Omvedt Are big dams harmful (Sept. 28), the writer is equivocal like the tailor in Macbeth. It must be realised that the oustees, despite monetary compensation and other benefits, are denied benefits unlike the ones who will get the water for irrigation and electricity and the two cannot be equated with each other. The whole business of the big dams is to “rob Peter to pay Paul.” It does not seem to be fair by any standards.

B. D. TIWARI

Bhopal

Lessons taught

THERE IS a statement in a Sanskrit school text book. A son asks his father: how do people become blind? (Thata, Jana andha katham bhavati?) The father’s reply took my breath away: Son, it is the reward of sin. (Putra, etat papanam bhalam). The book, Sanskrit Gyan Jyoti, containing this statement is the prescribed reader for seventh standard in DAV schools in the Capital.

K. A. GEORGEKUTTY

Delhi

Natural development

IF PROXIMITY to , or remaining tuned to, nature indicates cultural superiority (Forum for Indigenous people... Oct. 5) then birds and wild animals too deserve it. The bookish scholars and specialists seem to have little idea of the privations and hardships the people are suffering from in the ongoing process of detribalisation in the name of development. We must desist from the slog-anistic phrases being used by high-sounding international organisations. ‘Indigenous’, for example. If some are called ‘indigenous’, are the rest ‘spurious’?

PRABHU DAYAL

Ranchi

Five-year fixation

THE SCENARIO emerging from the Elections-99 is not very different from one of the last Lok Sabha. In the present-day politics of grabbing power and of retaining the same by fair or foul means, there is every possibility a pre-poll alliance partner will sit on the fence, to destablise the government. We have not learnt from the past mistakes and still seem to cling to vote-bank politics. Now the question is how are we going to tackle the same situation cropping up once again? Or, are we going to face another elections?

Though the BJP has already thrown hints of amending the constitution to ensure a fixed five-year term for the Lok Sabha this amendment however would need the consent of other major political parties. As a step in that direction, the alliance partners make a solemn declaration that they will not break from the alliance at least for five years and also resolve their intra-alliance differences without precipitating a break. The norms of the anti-Defection Law should be made applicable to the pre-poll alliance as one unit instead of individual parties.

B. M. MASAND

Delhi


Other Stories