This is Google's cache of http://www2.hindustantimes.com/ht/nonfram/190999/detlet01.htm.
Google's cache is the snapshot that we took of the page as we crawled the web.
The page may have changed since that time. Click here for the current page without highlighting.


Google is not affiliated with the authors of this page nor responsible for its content.

Don’t play with fire - [19/09/99] - The Hindustan Times
The Hindustan Times
Updated 02:00 IST[Late CitySunday, September 19, 1999, New Delhi
 

 NEWS
  FRONT PAGE
  CITY
  STATES
  NATION
  FOREIGN
  ECONOMY
  SPORTS
  CARTOON
  LETTERS
  ELECTION 99
  FEATURES
 HOME
 
 MAGAZINE
  NETFILE
  HTCITY
  SUNDAY
  GOURMET FARE
  ECARDS
  TODAY'S POLL
  HT INVESTOR
 
 MARKET
  CLASSIFIEDS
  STOCKS
  "CALL INDIA FROM US: 39 CENTS/MIN"
  JOBS
 
 OTHERS
  ABOUT US
  SEARCH
  ARCHIVE
  FEEDBACK
  ADVERTISE
 
 
Letters 
 

Don’t play with fire


MAJOR-GENERAL (Retd) Afsir Karim has raised an important issue in “We need a strong military, not a political one” (The Big Story, August 29). It is true the BJP and Vishwa Hindu Parishad are politicising the armed forces to gain a few extra seats by talking too much about their voting rights and distributing religious texts.

The soldier has the right to vote, but this is not always possible because of the call of duty. This fact he must live with.

Next, politicians will start canvassing in cantonments and combat units. The outcome will be meddling in politics by the military.

Deepak Kumar Dixit

Mawana (Meerut)

Not to blame

IT IS true vultures have disappeared in large numbers (“What’s eating the vulture?” by K Hari Warrier, Issues, August 29), but please do not blame aviators. When aviation was losing crores due to bird-hits, nobody bothered.

The decline of vultures in urban areas and from around airports is good not only for urban lifestyles and aircraft, but for these birds also. Vultures do not belong to urban areas. If a few birds, which are not protected species, are killed to save aircraft and human lives, it may not be wrong.

Secondly, the declining species are mainly the white-backed vulture and griffons, which easily cover 50-100 km in search of carcasses. Whitebacks roost wherever food is available, so habitat loss cannot be a reason.

Let us save aircraft, vultures and our own lives in a constructive way.

SM Satheesan

WWF India

New Delhi

Too hurried

IN “CONTEMPT of the people” (The Big Story, August 8), Sumir Lal seems to have collected his impressions about the Narmada project in a desperate hurry.

Gajanand Patidar, the landlord he met in Pathrad village, will lose only 2.98 acres three years hence. Pathrad will be submerged by the Maheshwar project, which will provide power and all-round development of Khargone, one of the poorest districts in Madhya Pradesh. Only five per cent of the agricultural land in the 61 affected villages will be submerged, and only around 2,500 families will be displaced.

The Maheshwar project will neither change the river’s course nor deprive it of its water. It will only take “energy” out of it. Is it a crime to plan judicious use of water?

Umesh Goswami

Khargone (MP)

Emergency clause

THE IMPRESSION one gathers from Salil Bawa’s “Stop, don’t touch those notes” (Money, August 29) is that in case of non-compliance with Section 269SS of the Income Tax Act, the penalty is mandatory and there is no scope to explain the non-compliance.

But under Section 273B, no penalty shall be imposed if the assessee proves there was reasonable cause for the non-compliance. Section 274 further provides that no order imposing a penalty shall be made unless the assessee has been heard or has been given a reasonable opportunity of being heard.

Bawa’s example that a fine was imposed on a person who demanded that a loan be repaid in cash because his wife was suddenly admitted to hospital, was avoidable.

Being an emergency, it would be covered under Section 273B, and the person could have explained this under the opportunity provided by Section 274. Sections 269SS and 269T have been inserted with a purpose, but exceptions have been duly taken care of.

Ved Jain

New Delhi

Irrelevant

CONTRARY TO Poonam Saxena’s views (“What sex? What violence?” Reflections, August 22), Hindi films are replete with sex, violence, sadism and stuntmanship, which are often irrelevant, unnecessary, excessive and larger than life.

JL Dhar

New Delhi


Other Stories