BALASAR CAMP

(Relief Camp For the Earthquake Affected, at Balasar, Taluka Rapar, District Kutch )

A Report

INDEX AND TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction................................................................................................................................................ 1

The Situation in the Area...................................................................................................................... 1

Balasar Camp : Work Methodology and Approach.......................................................... 2

Summary of Distribution Effort................................................................................................... 5

A.     TABLE ONE : Villages and Populations Reached............................................................ 5

B.     TABLE TWO : Total Relief Distributed (Major Items).................................................... 6

C.     TABLE THREE : Material Handed Over to KNA, Ratanpar............................................ 6

Organisations Associated With the Camp................................................................................ 7

Observations and Evaluation........................................................................................................... 8

Suggestions and Recommendations............................................................................................ 8

A.     Related to Housing........................................................................................................................ 8

B.     Related to Relief............................................................................................................................. 9

C.     Policy Level Issues......................................................................................................................... 9

Future Plans............................................................................................................................................... 10

POST SCRIPT.................................................................................................................................................... 11

Contact Addresses................................................................................................................................. 12

ANNEXURES

Annex I :        Schematic Map of the Villages Balasar Camp Worked In

Annex II :       List of Villages Which  Balasar Camp Worked In

Annex II:        List of Village Committees For Each Village (Not included in this Version of Report)

Annex III :      Detailed List of  Families for Each Village (Not included in this Version of Report)

 
BALASAR CAMP

(Relief Camp For the Earthquake Affected, at Balasar, Taluka Rapar, District Kutch )

A Report

Introduction

The Narmada Bachao Andolan, with the assistance of several supporters and associated organisations, initiated a relief camp at Village Balasar, Taluka Rapar, District Kutch in Gujarat to provide immediate relief to the people affected by the terrible earthquake that hit Gujarat on 26th January 2001. The Camp, which was set up at Balasar on 3rd Feb. 2001 was wound up on 16th Feb. 2001. After the formal winding up of the camp also, two volunteers remained in the village to complete the remaining work. It is planned that sometime later, a tour of the area will be undertaken by the active members of the Camp to maintain contact with the area and for follow up work. Some form of long term involvement in the rehabilitation and reconstruction work in the area is also being planned. This camp was known all over the area as “Balasar Camp”, and will be so referred to in this report.

This report is being written with two objectives:

To provide information about the distribution of relief material and other work undertaken by this camp to those who had sent relief material, financial assistance etc. for the earthquake affected through this Camp or through Narmada Bachao Andolan.

To provide relevant information to those who wish to work further in this area especially on rehabilitation and reconstruction work

Relief and related work was carried out in over 45 villages and wandhs (hamlets) by Balasar Camp. Wandhs  are the small hamlets / settlements  that lie at a distance from the main village.

The Situation in the Area

Before coming to the area, we did not have any clear idea about the situation in this area about the impact of the earthquake, the loss of lives, the situation of the relief and rescue operations, needs of the area etc. In fact, proper information about all these about any area was difficult to come by. We only had some broad idea about these things. Hence, the first activity that was initiated by the Balasar Camp was a preliminary and elementary survey of the area to collect information about the villages, impact of the earthquake and so on.

The whole area has been a victim of a terrible natural calamity of unimaginable proportions. The destruction is immeasurable. Though the loss of life is comparatively small in this area, almost all the houses have been completely destroyed. All the houses have either fallen down, or have been damaged so badly that they are totally unsafe to live in. People are being forced to live, sleep out in the open in the middle of bitter cold with temperatures going down to 2oC. This is also because powerful aftershocks and tremors are being felt to this day and the population is living is constant fear.

Before the establishment of Balasar Camp, very little relief had reached the area. Whatever little had reached too had reached only the villages on the main road. Even with this relief, the problem was that essential relief material was not reaching (for e.g. tents), while heaps of unnecessary and unwanted things were piling up (for e.g. clothes).

The other major problem with the relief was of distribution. There was no system or arrangement for an equitable and impartial distribution of the relief material. Because of this, the whatever little relief material was reaching the villages on the road was not even reaching all the families in the village, let alone reaching the villages and wandhs  in the interior. The socially-economically backward sections of the villages and the more needy people were most deprived even in the relief. The groups coming in with relief material were also mostly those who wanted to come in with the relief, dump it and leave immediately. Because of this, they were either distributing the relief material in an ad hoc manner, or worse, simply dumping it in the village and leaving. Some groups were even just throwing the material from the trucks and people were forced to run after the trucks to get some bits of the relief. Self respecting families therefore kept away from such “distribution” of relief, and hence remained deprived of support.  In any case, the distribution of relief is a very sensitive and delicate issue, and it is critical that the process be carried out in a way that the self-respect and dignity of people is maintained.

There was also almost total absence of any coordination in the distribution of relief.

After the establishment of the Balasar Camp, relief material started coming in and this is still going on. However, there is still a shortage of critical things like tents.

The Balasar Camp started with two lorry full of relief material collected from the Nimad area of the Narmada Valley and about 50 volunteers. Afterwards, more relief material, volunteers also came in from the Valley. Relief material and volunteers from other parts of the country also joined this. Particularly important was the contribution of Harayana Government which has adopted several villages in this area.

Balasar Camp : Work Methodology and Approach

Looking at the situation in the area, the following approach and methodology was adopted for the work of Balasar Camp.

First of all, a survey was conducted in the villages and wandhs to gather the basic information like general information, number of households, total population, loss of life, destruction of houses, general infrastructure and amenities like water, power, school etc.

A village gram sabha meeting was called in every village and in this meeting, a village committee (Gram Samiti) was constituted consisting of 2-3 representatives from every caste group. This was done on the need and demand of the people of the villages to establish a proper distribution system.

It was decided that all relief work, especially distribution of relief material would be undertaken through these gram samitis.

We believe that the people themselves should conduct the relief operations. From a strategic point of view also this is the most appropriate. Hence, we encouraged these village committees to undertake and conduct all related activities.

After the village committees were formed, the detailed list of families / households in the villages were prepared by these village committees. (The last census was of 1991 – over 10 years old!) These lists included the name of the head of the household and the total members of the family.

Many organisations were doing the distribution of relief material based on a “per family” criterion. This resulted in the larger families getting proportionately less relief. We made “per head” as the criterion of relief distribution. An assessment was made for the “per head, per day” requirement of grain and food and the ration quota for 15 days/ 30 days were fixed for various food items like grains, daal, oil etc.

Looking at the situation, the following objectives were adopted for the Balasar Camp in this phase of immediate relief.

To conduct surveys in each village and form the village committees, and then get these village committees to prepare the full list of families / households and population of the village. After this, through the village committees:

Make available immediate medical attention and immediate food rations for a few days at least

Make available at least one tent / tarpaulin to every family

Make available at least one blanket per person

Subsequently, make available food rations for minimum one month for all the people

To monitor the village committees and their functioning by cross-checking their work, through discussions in the village, follow up meetings and so on.

Apart from these objectives, the broader objectives included:

To establish a decentralised and representative (all caste / all group) system through the medium of the village committees so that all future relief and reconstruction work can be undertaken in a equitable way by the people themselves.

To ensure that the dignity and self respect of the people is maintained during the distribution of relief material and to make sure that a “dependency mentality” does not come in.

To present suggestions / plans for the longer term relief / rehabilitation / reconstruction work.

We started our work with the relief material that we had brought along with us. The work started with the distribution in Balasar village. For this, the Balasar village committee prepared the full list of households in the village. Since the village was big, family cards were prepared based on this list. Then, all the households assembled at a central place after fixing a proper time. The relief was distributed on the basis of the family cards under the supervision of the village committee and the volunteers of NBA and Balasar Camp.  This process ensured that the distribution was done in a dignified way, and that the relief material reached everyone. Since the distribution was being undertaken by the village committee itself, there was no feeling of some “donor” coming in and “giving” them something. The people of the village were very pleased and impressed with this method of distribution.

This method of distribution was followed in all the rest of the villages. A special effort was made to trace out and reach such villages and wandhs  which had not received any relief so far. Indeed, many of the interior wandhs  were not even on the list of revenue villages.

At this point of time, we received information that the Haryana Government had adopted 28 villages in this area. However, in absence of any information and assistance, they had not been able to reach to any of the villages. Balasar was one of the villages adopted by Haryana Government. The Haryana Government was impressed with the distribution system established by us, and they requested us to assist them in the distribution. In this way we started working with the Haryana Government, which soon too established a camp in Balasar village. We worked in close coordination with this Camp of Haryana Government. The Haryana Government had ample supply of relief material.

We continued the work of holding village meetings, constituting the village committees, preparing village household lists etc. and provided the Haryana Government camp with the list of requirements of each village. The distribution was carried out by the village committees with the officers of the Haryana Government and volunteers of Balasar Camp present. The efforts of Haryana Government and our camp were complementary to each other.

Apart from these villages, we also selected 18 villages which neither Haryana Government nor any other organisation had adopted and where relief was not reaching. We distributed relief according to the objectives of the Camp to these villages. We also distributed relief in some of the villages adopted by the Haryana Government.

When the information about the work of the Balasar Camp and its methodology, the contacts established by it with the villages etc. reached other people, they expressed a desire to route their distribution through the Balasar Camp. The Government check post, as also other organisations started routing relief trucks to our Camp. Those who wanted to just bring in relief material, distribute it and return immediately found the Balasar Camp especially useful. They not only got proper guidance as to which village to go to for distribution, but the volunteers of the Balasar Camp also accompanied them and helped them with the distribution through the village committees. We at the Balasar Camp had full information on about 54 villages, including the households, population, requirements, what all relief had reached these villages and so on, and hence we were in a good position to guide the people who came in with relief material. Thus, the Balasar Camp also worked as a coordination unit for these 54 villages.

One of the important objectives of the camp was to establish that the people take responsibility for the relief work themselves. The village committees were an important part of this. Further, many of the people of villages, the youths,  especially of Balasar and Manani wandh also joined the work of the camp as volunteers. They not only helped in the relief effort in their own villages, but also took part in holding meetings, distribution and other activities in other villages.

Summary of Distribution Effort

Thorough the Balasar Camp, we distributed relief material collected by the people of the Narmada Valley, material purchased by us by the cash contributions received by us, material sent to us by other supporters/ organisations, and material provided by the Haryana Government. The following summarizes the efforts of the Balasar Camp.

TABLE ONE : Villages and Populations Reached

1.

Total Villages / wandhs  where survey was undertaken by us

19/35 = 54

2.

Total Villages / wandhs  where distribution was undertaken through our camp (Either we distributed material collected by us, or we assisted others in distribution of their material)

12/33 = 45

3.

Out of the above, the villages/wandhs  adopted by the Haryana Government

9/19 = 28

4.

Villages / wandhs  adopted by Haryana Government where our Camp also distributed Relief material

3/17 = 20

5.

Total number of families to whom relief material was distributed through Balasar Camp

5814

6.

Total population to whom relief material was distributed through Balasar Camp

27,041

The basic objectives of the Camp were almost fully realized in the villages to where we reached.

TABLE TWO : Total Relief Distributed (Major Items)

This is the relief material collected and distributed by us and does not include the relief material of Haryana Government which we helped distribute.

1.

Tent / Tarpaulin

1227 nos.

2.

Bajri

20,300 kgs

3.

Wheat

12,175 kgs

4.

Wheat Flour

10,875 kgs

5.

Daal

4,087 kgs

6.

Rice

36,412 kgs

7.

Blankets

5,788 nos.

8.

Utensils

2,565 sets

9.

Sugar

1,750 kgs

10.

Sukhadi

4,790 kgs

11.

Oil

783 kgs

12.

Potatoes

7,940 kgs

13.

Onion

360 kgs

14.

Masala

150 kgs

15.

Warm Clothes

3 truck loads

16.

Fodder

73,690 kgs

Apart from this, when the camp was lifted, the following remaining material was handed over to the sub-centre of “Kutch Navnirman Abhiyaan” based in Ratanpar nearby. This sub-Centre was continuing the distribution and hence material was handed over to them.

TABLE THREE : Material Handed Over to KNA, Ratanpar

1.

Tarpaulin

240 nos.

2.

Daari (Carpet)

225 nos.

3.

Blankets

225 nos.

4.

Godadi (Rajaai)

150 nos.

5.

Utensils

2150 sets

6.

Sugar

100 kgs

7.

Wheat

100 kgs

8.

Rice

2580 kgs

9.

Wheat Flour

80 kgs

10.

Chanaa

40 kgs

11.

Chataai (Mats)

50 nos.

12.

Bamboo Poles (Small)

770 nos

13.

Bamboo Poles (Big)

415 nos.

14.

Daal

85 kgs

15.

Salt

60 Kgs.

Organisations Associated With the Camp

Establishment, Coordination and Running of the Camp

Narmada Bachao Andolan (Gujarat, M.P. , Maharashtra )

Organisations / Individuals Associated in Running the Camp

Ramesh Sharma, Ekta Parishad

Sadhana Dadhich, Nari Samata Manch, Pune

Swati Sheshadri, Badwani

Mayur Barot, Anand, Gujarat

Popat Tantod, Anklawadi, Dist. Anand, Gujarat

Sunandan Tiwari, N.Delhi

Rajkumar Ananthan, Mumbai

Varun Kapur, N.Delhi

Vitthal Shendge, “Bhoomiputra”, Majalgaon, Maharashtra

Nisarg Seva Mandal, Aurangabad, Maharashtra

Venu Govindu

Shankar Krishnan

Friends of Bhuj, SRM College, Chennai

Dr. Sharad

Dr. Sandip Patil

Dr. Apaschim Barant

Students of Babasaheb Ambedkar University, Aurangabad

Babubhai Patidar, Umiyadham Trust, Karondia, Dist. Khargone, M.P.

Other Organisations Who Participated in the Camp / Contributed Relief Supplies

Kanchipuram District People’s Forum, Tamil Nadu

Manav Sewa Trust, Haryana

Odissa Disaster mitigation Mission, Odissa

Senior Citizens Council, Ahemdabad

S.B. College, Aurangabad

Harinder K. Sandhu College, Chandigadh

Geography Study Institute, Allahbad

Gopeshwar Vidyapeeth, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Snehal Bhatt, Gujarat Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Baroda (Provision of Grass, Fodder)

Jayanti bhai Modi, Sudan Steel, Rajkot (Provision of Grass, Fodder)

People of Kalinga, Haryana

Swami Shantaramji Maharaj, Jalaandhar

Motibhai Foundation, Mehsana (Provision of JCB)

Friends from “Bharat Jodo”, Mumbai

Gangabehn and Friends, Mumbai

Special Thanks

Rameshbhai Sanghvi, Dineshbhai Sanghvi, “Gram Swaraj Sangh”, Sontekri, Neelpar, Taluka Rapar, Dist. Kutch

“Locost”, Baroda

“Shishu Milap”, Baroda

Observations and Evaluation

The following are the observations and evaluation of the situation from the experience of the camp.

There was a lack of correspondence  between the requirements of relief and the material that poured in, at least initially.

Very limited information was available about the earthquake affected areas, the physical and human devastation, the geography, communication and so on, and this hindered the prompt and proper reaching of relief to these, especially far flung wandhs  and villages. The District and Taluka authorities should have made this information available.

Apart from  houses, the infrastructure in the villages too has been severally damaged and needs to be reconstructed. This includes school, post offices, water and electricity systems etc.

The area has been suffering from second consecutive drought. This combined with the earthquake has severally affected the employment opportunities in the area. Special attention needs to be paid to provide employment, and it would be best if the reconstruction efforts are designed in a such a way to provide maximum local employment.

Cattle economy is an important part of the area as are the handicrafts and both must be given proper attention.

The Government and administration has to play the central role in the relief and reconstruction efforts. It has the main responsibility. Yet, there was a total absence of these in the area, in the initial phases. There was also a lack of coordination between the various organisations and between the organisations and the Government.

Water is one of the critical issues of the area, at the same time there are lots of possibilities for developing water resources. These need to be examined properly.

Suggestions and Recommendations

Related to Housing

The destruction of houses is almost 100% in the area where we worked, and people are still sleeping out in the open. There is still need for proper tents / tarpaulin.

The reconstruction of housing would have to be in three stages : Immediate Relief (Tents, tarpaulin), intermediate stage – transitory shelters, which can see the people through the grueling summer and monsoon, and finally permanent or final houses.

The tents / tarpaulin being given under the first stage of relief are inadequate for the people, given the size of the family, need for storage of grains, household goods, cattle etc.

All people are concerned about the proper (transitory) housing for the summer and monsoon as the tents / tarpaulin will not be adequate at all for this. People are also worried about unseasonal rains which would affect them badly.

People are not prepared to construct their final houses for at least the next six months or so, as they are afraid of the earthquake striking again, with the continuing tremors in the area. They also do not have the financial resources for the same. Since any kind of permanent housing will take time, there is need for proper transit housing.

There is a need for proper planning, and holistic approach for the reconstruction of the village, permanent housing and the infrastructure amenities. Reconstruction should make full use of local material, local labour input and address the needs of the people. It can form a critical part of the “food for work” type of program so that people’s needs of food grains are met without any “relief”.

The issue of whether to relocate the village or to reconstruct it at the same time is a very sensitive issue and must be decided only with the extensive consultation of the villagers.

Where new earthquake resistant materials and techniques are being introduced (as will be necessary) this should be done through a process fully involving the people and through proper education.

Related to Relief

Health services are inadequate or absent in most of the villages in this area. As people have to stay out in the open, they, especially the children and elderly are being affected. There is a need for extending health services to all villages. There is also a need for trauma care and counseling.

The structure established by Balasar Camp for the distribution effort should be strengthened and this should form the medium for all further relief and reconstruction efforts.

The people of the area are now desirous that further relief should not in the form of “relief” but rather in form of employment (“rahaat nahin, rojgaar” is what people are saying) since they too are seeing the tendencies of dependency and begging which relief is creating in some pockets. Further process of relief and reconstruction should be decided with the full participation of the people.

The area has been facing drought for last two years. Relief should be decided keeping in view the entire situation and not just earthquake.

Policy Level Issues

The whole process of reconstruction and rehabilitation should be fully and properly integrated into and linked with the larger development plans of the area otherwise the focus will remain on the reconstruction and this will result in a one sided process.

The situation is vastly different in different parts of Kutch stretching from Bhuj to Rapar, and hence the approaches and needs will be different.

A large number of migrant workers (those who had gone from Kutch to Mumbai, Surat etc.) have returned back to Kutch after the earthquake and hence proper employment opportunities should be provided to these people also.

The compensation for the loss of life and property should be determined in an open and transparent way and with the role of the village committees.

A number of industries, agencies, organisations have “adopted” villages. There needs to be a proper framework to specify what “adoption” exactly means and the responsibilities of those adopting villages. Those adopting the villages should be directed to function with the guidance of the village committees.

Various NGOs and voluntary organisations can play a critical role in the reconstruction efforts and this should be recognised and appropriate space created for them.

Future Plans

The future plans and commitments of the Balasar Camp team in general and NBA in particular are to be finalized soon. However, some specific and some general plans have emerged which are as follows.

Medical Centre at Balasar : Two doctors associated with the “Bharat Jodo” team which had participated in the Balasar Camp have given a commitment to run a medical centre at Balasar for three months. This centre will cater to the medical needs of many of the nearby villages too. The villagers have agreed to give land for the centre. Hopefully, this will later on lead to a PHC being set up by the Government. The centre should be up by the end of February. NBA activists associated with Balasar Camp will help the doctors to set the centre.

Earthquake proof housing : It is planned to get some experts teams to visit the area and assist the villages in planning earthquake proof housing. Education programs related to this are also planned.

The villager of Balasar have pointed out that there is a need to undertake de-silting of the pond (lake) in Balasar. This, if done even to the extent of 3 feet they say will ensure that they will have drinking water all year round even in drought. It was seen that even now, after two consecutive years of drought, the pond still has fair amount of water. It is planned to undertake this work as a follow up work.

The people of Balasar village have expressed a need for building their school building at the earliest. Both the schools have been totally destroyed. The schools are running in tents at present. We hope that this too will be one of the things we take up.

Further plans and specific decisions on the above where these are yet to be taken will be taken soon.

We thank all those who extended their generous hands in assisting the earthquake relief work either through cash donations or through collections in kind.

Narmada Bachao Andolan

16 February 2001

POST SCRIPT

Balasar Camp was wound up on 16th Feb. 2001 in the evening. It was decided that the team would then tour the other earthquake affected areas of Kutch to get a broader picture of the situation, talk to various NGOs working in other parts, and so on to help us plan the further involvement in a better way. Another purpose was also to report about work done by us at Balasar to other local NGOs so as to give them information about what had happened in this area. A team started from Balasar with this aim on 17th Feb. 2001.

We first went to Neelpar and met the coordinator Shri Dineshbhai Sanghvi there. The “Gram Swaraj Sangh” there has contacts in the local area as it has been working in the area for long. It was Ramesh Sanghvi of this Ashram who guided us to Balasar when we came to this area. (on 2nd Feb. 2001). This Ashram, established by Shri Manibhai Sanghvi in 1968 is involved in children’s education in the area, apart from some other activities. The Ashram is one of the “centres” of the Kutch Navnirman Abhiyaan. A copy of the Report of Balasar Camp was given to Shri Sanghvi and the work and issues discussed.

After this, we went to Lakadiya, Taluka Bhachau, at the headquarters of the Gujarat Jan Jagran Sangh. GJJS is a mass organisation working since many years in the area, with its activities ranging from mass mobilisation, agitation and reconstruction. GJJS had undertaken cattle camps in Balasar during the drought. It is carrying out employment generation program by building a village pond in Dora Basti. The GJJS has live contact with the villagers in this area. GJJS has also been closely associated with NBA and supports its work. GJJS is working extensively in the earthquake relief work and has plans to continue the work into the reconstruction phase along with the employment generation schemes and so on. Shri Tejabhai of GJJS had visited the Balasar Camp. A copy of the Report of Balasar Camp was given to Shri Rasikbhai Rajgor of GJJS at Lakadiya Camp. NBA wishes to continue long term linkage with GJJS in the earthquake relief and reconstruction efforts.

After this, we visited Adhoi, Bhachau – the worst affected areas – and took the night halt at the camp of “Sneha Samudya” at Moti Chirai. This is a joint effort of about 12 organisations like Janpath, Action Aid, students of several universities and so on. They are working towards the long term rehabilitation of the disabled, widows and orphans in the villages in the area.

Next day we traveled to Anjar town. Bhachau and Anjar town have been almost totally devastated.  The human tragedy is not possible to describe in words. From Anjar we went to Bhuj.  The old city of Bhuj has been totally destroyed. 

Here we met the activists of “Kutch Navnirman Abhiyaan”. KNA is an association of about 21 NGOs which had been set up when Kutch was hit by the massive cyclone a couple of years ago. Organisations like “Kutch Mahila Vikas Sangthan” are a major part of the KNA. Gram Swaraj Sangh at Neelpar is also a part of the KNA. KNA is now working for relief and reconstruction of the earthquake affected. It is trying to set up a coordination in the efforts of the many NGOs and groups working on this issue. The KNA has evolved a structure of several centres and sub-centres all over the earthquake affected area of Kutch. Each of the sub-centres will be working with a cluster of villages. In this manner, a coordinated, networked way of working is being evolved. KNA has a daily briefing session with the Kutch Collector in the morning and issues from all the sub-centres are raised there. KNA too has not decided to move from the relief work phase to the reconstruction phase, and their priority is the interim, transitory accommodation in the villages.

Balasar is being viewed a potential sub-centre in the KNA structure and KNA wants to place two full time workers here. We has detailed discussions with Susham Iyengar, Sandeep Viramani and Bhaskar Niranjani, and a copy of the Balasar Camp report was handed over to them. KNA has planned a meeting on 21-22 for deciding on their future work.

This round has given us some ideas about the impact of the earthquake in rest of Kutch, future direction of the work, the efforts of other groups and NGOs, the issues that lie in the future and all this will help us greatly in planning our future involvement. We hope to crystallise soon our longer term plans and commitments, and hope to continue the work in close coordination with other groups and NGOs.

Balasar Camp Team

19 Feb. 2001

Contact Addresses

Nandini Oza, Shripad Dharmadhikary, Narmada Bachao Andolan, B 13 Shivam Flats, Ellora Park, Vadodara (Gujarat) 390 007  Ph. & Fax: 0265-38 22 32 Email : shripad@narmada.org

Clifton D’Rozario, Rehmat, Narmada Bachao Andolan, 62 M.G. Road, Badwani, M.P. 451 551 Ph: 07290- 22 464 Email: badwani@narmada.org, clifton@narmada.org

Alok Agarwaal, Narmada Bachao Andolan, Jail Road, Mandleshwar, Dist. Khargone, M.P. Ph: 07283-33 162  Email : nobigdam@vsnl.com

Ramesh Chandra Sharma, Resource Centre (Ekta Parishad), G 74/18 South T.T. Nagar, Bhopal 462 003 Ph: 0755-77 88 42 Fax: 0755-710 719 Email: sharmaramesh2@rediffmail.com

Annex II

Villages Surveyed by Balasar Camp and Details of Distribution of Relief in the Surveyed Villages

Sr. No

Name of Village

Total Household / Total Population

Distribution By NBA (Balasar Camp )

Distribution by Haryana Government through the assistance of Balasar Camp

1

Balasar

667@3018

yes

yes

2

Rasaji Na Gadhada

135@644

yes

yes

3

Rabari Wandh 

105@506

yes

yes

4

Lodrani

579@2611

yes

5

Manani Wandh

40@208

yes

yes

6

Versara

155@610

yes

7

Jodhrai Wandh

90@329

yes

8

Dosa Wandh 

20@120

yes

yes

9

Shira ni Wandh 

196@900

yes

10

Desalpar

386@1837

11

Davri

300@1091

12

Rivechi Nagar

14@108

13

Chagan Wandh 

11@38

yes

14

Sakaria Wandh 

10@47

yes

15

Karsara Wandh  (Moti)

56@258

yes

16

Karsara Wandh  (Nani)

36@163

yes

17

Surbha Wandh 

52@228

yes

18

Miyapati Wandh 

28@115

yes

19

Lakada Wandh 

76@297

yes

20

Shiyatar Wandh 

25@127

yes

21

Jatawada

703@3883

yes

22

Jilaar Wandh 

65@315

yes

yes

23

Kaliyar Wandh 

24@100

yes

24

Kumber Kheda

33@193

yes

yes

25

Dabada

150@900

yes

26

Gowapar Wandh 

46@244

yes

27

Kachadahar Wandh 

14@90

yes

yes

28

Brajwani

250@1017

yes

29

Anantpar

360@1579

yes

30

Bisasar Wandh 

61@308

yes

yes

31

Rupani Wandh 

38@210

yes

yes

32

Hanuman Wandh  / Harijan Basti

27@146

yes

yes

33

Sorila Wandh 

33@175

yes

yes

34

Khodiyar Wandh 

66@378

yes

yes

35

Boyra Dam ni Wandh 

19@88

yes

yes

36

Mowana

250@1000

yes

37

Dora Basti

41@207

yes

yes

38

Sukna Wandh 

34@171

yes

yes

39

Shishgadh

180@1100

yes

40

Deglia Wandh 

28@91

yes

yes

41

Moti Rao

800@4500

42

Nani Rao

500@2500

43

Shanpar

129@544

yes

44

Kanani Wandh

25@103

yes

45

Narayanpar

7@32

yes

46

Bela

714@3190

yes

47

Koli Wandh

28@132

yes

yes

48

Ratanpar

124@600

yes

49

Dogra ni Wandh

31@166

yes

50

Kharoda Wandh

63@360

yes

51

Kalyanpar

206@1500

52

Janan

244@1000

53

Ganeshpar

220@1000

54

Dholavira

234@1688